Untitled
joelaz:

New Tumblr “Like” Feature
You can now “like” a post in your Tumblr Dashboard without having to reblog it.  I “like” it.
Update: Apparently not everyone can see the heart button just yet.  I imagine Tumblr is rolling this feature out now… be patient :)

joelaz:

New Tumblr “Like” Feature

You can now “like” a post in your Tumblr Dashboard without having to reblog it.  I “like” it.

Update: Apparently not everyone can see the heart button just yet.  I imagine Tumblr is rolling this feature out now… be patient :)

markcoatney:

staff:

One of the great things about Tumblr is that people use it for just about every conceivable kind of expression. People being people, though, that means that Tumblr sometimes gets used for things that are just wrong. We are deeply committed to supporting and defending our users’ freedom of speech,…

Some really nice, thoughtful work from our policy folks on this. 

kbkonnected:

30 Sites for Students Who Finish Early!
#elemchat #spedchat #4thchat #5thchat #1stchat
 From previous post: ”If your students are anything like mine they can get into a lot of mischief if they don’t have something to do, even in a short amount of time. These are sites that are fun, will engage them creatively, as well as intellectually, and also keep them out of trouble.”
I just added 10 more sites to my list from a previous post. I know some classrooms are using this list because they come to my old post every week. I occasionally add a few more sites  for them. I don’t know any of their grade levels or interests so I just try to mix it up. It seems they must find things they like because they keep coming back.
Here are the links that I have added so far.
Litebrite
My Oats 
Crayola
Flame
Drawminos
Eye Candy
This is Sand  (use the “c” to change colors)
Spirograph
String Spin
Bomomo
…and there’s no cleanup!
JUST ADDED!!!
Amazing Animal WebCams
FRABOOM!
Flabby Physics
Magnetic Poetry
Solid Edge Garage
San Diego Zoo Kids 
Storyline Online
Sporcle
MathsDuck
Origami Club
Just added! (again)
10 Awesome Word Games
Vocabulary Pinball
Math Madness (basketball)
Dark Claw (thrilling reading saga - 6 books in all)
The Surfing Scientist
Give the Dog a Bone (fast paced number game)
Cartoon Maker (9 fun choices)
Create-a-Card (greeting card creator with a twist or should I say spin)
Youngzine (online magazine for students)
Poisson Rouge (Red Fish) (amazing site for younger students)
WooHoo!!! (Adding for March) 

Read to Me LV
lichess Great chess site. Play alone or with a friend.
Scrap Coloring
Word Whizz 
Orisinal
Stop Frame Animator
Monster School Bus
Math Motorway
Dr. Seuss Story Maker
Flying Skunk Farm Fun and you can really feed the chickens!


Just added…30+ Sites for LOVEly Students!
Adding this for the Winter Season…Happy Holidays!

Click on picture.
Pin It
tyler attorney

kbkonnected:

30 Sites for Students Who Finish Early!

#elemchat #spedchat #4thchat #5thchat #1stchat

 From previous post: ”If your students are anything like mine they can get into a lot of mischief if they don’t have something to do, even in a short amount of time. These are sites that are fun, will engage them creatively, as well as intellectually, and also keep them out of trouble.”

I just added 10 more sites to my list from a previous post. I know some classrooms are using this list because they come to my old post every week. I occasionally add a few more sites  for them. I don’t know any of their grade levels or interests so I just try to mix it up. It seems they must find things they like because they keep coming back.

Here are the links that I have added so far.

…and there’s no cleanup!

JUST ADDED!!!

Just added! (again)

WooHoo!!! (Adding for March) 

Just added…30+ Sites for LOVEly Students!

Adding this for the Winter Season…Happy Holidays!

Click on picture.

Pin It


tyler attorney

staff:

Introducing: Tumblr BlackBerry App

Built by the same brilliant team behind the Tumblr iPhone App, v1 of the official Tumblr BlackBerry App is ready to download!

Click here from your BlackBerry to install

blurintofocus:

drinkyourjuice:

and I know of some very talented people who partake in it, so I must be missing something.

I can’t relate anthropologically. I’m like an Ancient Mayan thrust forward in time and looking at a Ford Focus. What can this possibly offer me substantively and if I bludgeon it now to assert my authority…

Reblogging to address because I kept running out of space in my comment.  Recap culture and why I’m a part of it.

First, let me say, I agree with Christine’s main thrust — more details and thoughtful writing on television is PREFERRED.  My personal favorite writing about television I’ve done has been somewhat removed from the daily deadlines of recapping, although I also have my favorite recaps — sometimes brutal honesty and analysis is born out of immediate reaction. In this case I am not talking about total linkbait recap pieces that many sites do just to collect eyes, but the thoughtful stuff (Vulture.  AV Club.  etc.)  It’s unfortunately that they’re stuck in a web race with the scraper sites that throw up keywords at the speed of light, but good work can be done, and done fast.

However, I want to point out three reasons why we recap — money, fandom and, the key one, required deep analysis — that makes me think the recap system, while flawed, is interesting and useful.

1. Google pageviews and rank. The day after a TV show airs, it is searched.  People who missed it want to know what happened. People who saw it want to see if there’s videos somewhere to watch, etc.  Sites are all competing for this traffic, and can win more with an “exclusive” piece of content. As someone who fights for exclusives for various sites, I can tell you the easiest “exclusive” is to pay a writer to recap something for you.  Unique content, googleable terms, etc.  That’s the easy answer to why we recap, that and the fact that talented writers get paid crap and getting a recap can be easy, regular money to supplement your passion projects.

2. Fandoms fandoming.  It’s part of the culture to pick apart and analyize every moment of your favorite thing.  There are gifs of single facial expressions on shows that are picked apart with the fervor one reserves for The Metamorphosis in whole.  And the very best analysis of shows are the ones only fans see, and the ones that no one makes a cent off.  However, the culture devours the media recaps, either to make fun or to highlight the points of excitement.  They use them to document their fandom history (I learned this by checking my own name on Wikipedia) and the media story of their favorite stories.

3. A way that forces us writers to think about TV culture consistently.  If I didn’t recap, I wouldn’t be so immersed in the culture of my fandom.  I have to analyze the ups and downs of Glee every single week. It makes me more prone to notice both the flaws and the actual through-lines that will make better think-pieces during the long summer hiatus. It makes me a better writer, too, to be forced to write on deadline every week (I was also the kind of writer who thrived on the restrictions of AP exams, so that could just be personal.)

All that said, I wish recaps existed in a less frantic and overdone way, but I think they’re great when done right.  Plus, I can’t be bothered to watch Idol anymore but I read every single Dave Holmes recap so I know who to vote for him my Idol fantasy pool.

Dear Tumblr

oatmeal:

If you’re going to go down, you might as well blame it on an imaginary animal like Twitter did with their infamous Fail Whale. I’ve taken the liberty of creating this animal for you:

Please use it. 

Please oh please. 

-The Oatmeal

Update:  Tumblr used the TumblBeasts!  Check it out :D

her0inchic:

A boy left his bike chained to a tree when he went away to war in 1914. He never returned, leaving the tree no choice but to grow around the bike.

her0inchic:

A boy left his bike chained to a tree when he went away to war in 1914. He never returned, leaving the tree no choice but to grow around the bike.

tenones:

To the Reader,Thank you for reading 111-111-1111 — Ten Ones — my real-time edit of NYTimes.com visual matter. At the urging of The New York Times legal department, I have suspended postings and removed the archive. I created this Tumblr in the summer of 2010 as an experiment to see how the Times — where I worked as a web editor — could use the platform. (The name refers to the Caller ID signature of The New York Times.) The blog was a personal project viewing the NYTimes.com feed through an aesthetic lens. I surfaced beautiful and unexpected imagery, credited it and linked to the source articles. Fundamentally, Ten Ones was a daily accounting of the amazing online report the paper produces. It highlighted in particular the impressive work of Times photographers, illustrators, photo editors and art directors.  The blog garnered a small audience on Tumblr and a following in the newsroom of The Times. When it came to the attention of the company’s Senior Counsel, he asked that I remove all copyrighted New York Times content. This request effectively ended Ten Ones. Thanks to my friends at The Times and elsewhere who encouraged this project and helped get the word out. Thanks, too, to my Tumblr followers and rebloggers for answering the call.Jonathan S. Paul Editortenones.tumblr@gmail.com

tenones:

To the Reader,

Thank you for reading 111-111-1111 — Ten Ones — my real-time edit of NYTimes.com visual matter. At the urging of The New York Times legal department, I have suspended postings and removed the archive.

I created this Tumblr in the summer of 2010 as an experiment to see how the Times — where I worked as a web editor — could use the platform. (The name refers to the Caller ID signature of The New York Times.) The blog was a personal project viewing the NYTimes.com feed through an aesthetic lens. I surfaced beautiful and unexpected imagery, credited it and linked to the source articles.

Fundamentally, Ten Ones was a daily accounting of the amazing online report the paper produces. It highlighted in particular the impressive work of Times photographers, illustrators, photo editors and art directors. 

The blog garnered a small audience on Tumblr and a following in the newsroom of The Times. When it came to the attention of the company’s Senior Counsel, he asked that I remove all copyrighted New York Times content. This request effectively ended Ten Ones.

Thanks to my friends at The Times and elsewhere who encouraged this project and helped get the word out. Thanks, too, to my Tumblr followers and rebloggers for answering the call.

Jonathan S. Paul
Editor
tenones.tumblr@gmail.com

shortformblog:

A suggestion for Tumblr: Try to figure out a way so spammers can’t use this black-hat SEO (search engine optimization) technique. It’s dead simple to take advantage of, and as a result, some sites (such as our own) often drown in it. Today, for example, we got a ton of fake traffic from bots doing an obscure search on Google (see screenshots). Here’s a quick explanation as to what’s happening, as far as we can see:

  • first Black hat SEO types hit Google and type in this specific phrase — “site:tumblr.com ‘liked this’” — a common phrase on Tumblr due to the way it handles likes. 
  • then Then, sketchy bot types will create hundreds or thousands of fake Tumblr accounts whose URLs forward to a sketchy-looking site not on Tumblr.
  • result These sites end up getting hundreds or thousands of backlinks to their sketchy sites on Google — and all they had to do was like tons of people.

» But we have a temporary solution: Are you, like us, getting a lot of spam on your Tumblr? This is a likely reason. We’d like to offer a suggestion to solve the problem. If you know how to edit your theme in HTML, do a search for the phrase “{PostNotes}” and replace it with this: ”<!—googleoff: all—>{PostNotes}<!—googleon: all—>”. This prevents the notes from getting crawled by Google, which is good because it focuses your content, but bad, because any relevant content in reblogs won’t account for what shows up in search engines. This is really a problem Tumblr needs to look at — if they take out common phrases or make them invisible to search engines, everyone wins. But we hope this at least helps your sanity. It’ll help ours.

shortformblog:

A suggestion for Tumblr: Try to figure out a way so spammers can’t use this black-hat SEO (search engine optimization) technique. It’s dead simple to take advantage of, and as a result, some sites (such as our own) often drown in it. Today, for example, we got a ton of fake traffic from bots doing an obscure search on Google (see screenshots). Here’s a quick explanation as to what’s happening, as far as we can see:

  • first Black hat SEO types hit Google and type in this specific phrase — “site:tumblr.com ‘liked this’” — a common phrase on Tumblr due to the way it handles likes. 
  • then Then, sketchy bot types will create hundreds or thousands of fake Tumblr accounts whose URLs forward to a sketchy-looking site not on Tumblr.
  • result These sites end up getting hundreds or thousands of backlinks to their sketchy sites on Google — and all they had to do was like tons of people.

» But we have a temporary solution: Are you, like us, getting a lot of spam on your Tumblr? This is a likely reason. We’d like to offer a suggestion to solve the problem. If you know how to edit your theme in HTML, do a search for the phrase “{PostNotes}” and replace it with this: ”<!—googleoff: all—>{PostNotes}<!—googleon: all—>”. This prevents the notes from getting crawled by Google, which is good because it focuses your content, but bad, because any relevant content in reblogs won’t account for what shows up in search engines. This is really a problem Tumblr needs to look at — if they take out common phrases or make them invisible to search engines, everyone wins. But we hope this at least helps your sanity. It’ll help ours.